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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
How do you know if you will hit or miss a branch hanging down or a bush half way between you and your target? My arrow hit a branch once while shooting at a hog and it occurred to me that I should be able to know before the shot if an obstruction near my shot path is in play or not.

Here's what you can do to know for sure and it only takes about 2 or 3 extra seconds. Let's say you see a deer out feeding on the other side of a tree that has a branch hanging close to your shot path. You laser the deer as usual and let's say you get 50 yards. You then laser the branch in question and let's say for this example you get 30 yards. When you go to full draw on the deer and set your 50 yard pin on the vitals you simply check the location of your 30 yard pin. If it is on the branch at 30 yards then you are going to hit it. If your 30 yard pin is clear then you are good to go. The nice thing is if your 30 yard pin is on the branch you can usually rise up or down slightly to get clearance for the shot and know with confidence your shot is clear. This works for a bush that is covering the bottom half or more of your target. If that bush is also at 30 yards and you put your 50 yard pin where you know where the vitals are, you then check your 30 yard pin to see if it clears the top of the brush. If it does then you are clear for the shot. I hope this helps and all the best, RI Max
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Stabilization Questions and Answers

Length and Weight for Stabilizers

Both length and weight are the two key variables to measuring stabilization. More specifically, the physics term moment of inertia (MOI) describes how resistant to torque (i.e. rotational forces) something will be. When we calculate a single point of mass on the stabilizer to see how effective it is in resisting torque, we multiply that mass by its distance back to the axis of rotation squared. We can see the distal length weight is attached is much more important than weight itself. Weights effectiveness is quadrupled if you move it from the 6 inch to the 12 inch of your stabilizer for example. As a result, a 12 inch stabilizer with the desired weight rigidly attached on the end is unsurpassed for steadiness in archery in the bow hunter classes. (Only the B-Stinger can load weight forward to achieve a center of gravity in the last 25% of the distal end because of its patented design.)

Weight is the other key component in measuring stabilization or your stabilizers ability to resist torque. It turns out the more weight the better until it is too much. Too much is when you can't support the weight effectively and are starting to get the shakes for example. Or, when you start to drift while aiming and you can't seem to easily get your pin back on target. You want as much weight as you can comfortably support for your shooting task at hand.

There are two key factors you should notice when you have a properly fitted quality stabilizer on your bow. First, while aiming at full draw, you should notice your pin is moving slower and with less amplitude through your target. Second, when you make less than a perfect shot, you should see the results (where your arrow impacts) are not as bad as they used to be (i.e. tighter groups). Remember, a quality stabilizer will be more effective in resisting movement from torque at the time of the shot. Less movement means less negative impact to your arrow before it leaves the bow. How much more important is that when you have a broadhead on the tip of your arrow? All the best, RI Max
 

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great tip RIMAX! :grin:
 

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Here is one i use when following a sparse blood trail in the dark. Did this this past Saturday. Your on your knees looking for the next drop of blood, shine your light ahead and look for daddy longlegs(if you havem where you hunt),crickets, scorpians ect..these bugs love blood, at least ole' daddy longlegs and crickets, scorpians probly after the crickets. Anyway if you see them ahead of you they're probly feasting on a drop of blood and you can continue the trail till your find your game. Works for me.

Good luck :grin:
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Deer Hunting in Tree Stands

A bioligist told me in Colorado that when they trap deer they will often times use yellow lyken or missle toe for feed. When I heard that a couple years ago, it occured to me how many times have I had deer stop behind me to feed on the branches I had cut down for shooting lanes. Now I'm not saying to bait your deer, especially if it's not legal. I'm just saying how I've noticed that the branches I trim, especially those that have missle toe and or yellow lyken on them, don't seem to end up behind me anymore.

IGWSSIR2009!
 

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Is Orygun really that bad? I envisioned it as one of the last places where you can be truly free.
 

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yeah, it is. our deer population is really down because of the cougarsaround here. and awhile ago some bleeding heart anti hunters saw a video of a cougar being hunted with dogs. so they thought, oh we cant have that. so ever since then our deer herd has been declining from all of the cats eating the deer. :-D
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Tournament Shooters...& Hunters

Jesse Broadwater was telling me how he sets up his rest to be most forgiving when it comes to torque. He starts out with his rest forward and he shoots his best shot right down the center. He then torques his bow to the left and shoots an arrow and then to the right and shoots an arrow. He marks each of those arrows and then moves his rest back a little and repeats the process. He moves the rest back and repeats. Each time the arrows that are impacting left when he torques left and the arrow impacting right when he torques right are getting closer to the original center arrow in the middle. This is because the rest is approaching the vertical axis of rotation when he torques the bow. Eventually, the arrows cross the center and go the other way. When you twist your riser and shoot and the arrow goes in the middle with the original arrow, you have found the most forgiving spot for you rest. All the best, RI Max
 

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Re: Tournament Shooters...& Hunters

RI Max said:
Jesse Broadwater was telling me how he sets up his rest to be most forgiving when it comes to torque. He starts out with his rest forward and he shoots his best shot right down the center. He then torques his bow to the left and shoots an arrow and then to the right and shoots an arrow. He marks each of those arrows and then moves his rest back a little and repeats the process. He moves the rest back and repeats. Each time the arrows that are impacting left when he torques left and the arrow impacting right when he torques right are getting closer to the original center arrow in the middle. This is because the rest is approaching the vertical axis of rotation when he torques the bow. Eventually, the arrows cross the center and go the other way. When you twist your riser and shoot and the arrow goes in the middle with the original arrow, you have found the most forgiving spot for you rest. All the best, RI Max
Thanks for the post Blair, that is some valuable information :cool:
 

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Re: Tournament Shooters...& Hunters

RI Max said:
Jesse Broadwater was telling me how he sets up his rest to be most forgiving when it comes to torque. He starts out with his rest forward and he shoots his best shot right down the center. He then torques his bow to the left and shoots an arrow and then to the right and shoots an arrow. He marks each of those arrows and then moves his rest back a little and repeats the process. He moves the rest back and repeats. Each time the arrows that are impacting left when he torques left and the arrow impacting right when he torques right are getting closer to the original center arrow in the middle. This is because the rest is approaching the vertical axis of rotation when he torques the bow. Eventually, the arrows cross the center and go the other way. When you twist your riser and shoot and the arrow goes in the middle with the original arrow, you have found the most forgiving spot for you rest. All the best, RI Max
i will have to try this and see how it works out . curious to see if i end up different than i am now .
 

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Just wanted to put my 2 cents in
I hunt mostly out of a climber and don't always climb the same tree in the same area, this means that clear shooting lanes are not alway cut.
Once I have stopped climbing and am strapped in I tie off my pull rope thru my jacket sleeve and throw the jacket out in one direction clearing out the thinner branches. I then pull the jacket back with the pull rope and throw again as necessary.
 

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After a hunt in a tree-stand, especially a climber, collect all of your gear before climbing down. Same goes for climbing up. Climbing 30' up a tree then discovering you forgot to hook bow to rope. Even funnier still is when you lower your bow,climb down the tree,pack all your gear back in you r pack. Now it is dark you put on pack grab your bow. 5 steps later "someone " yanks your bow right out of your hand. Dam rope.
 

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*ncountry* said:
After a hunt in a tree-stand, especially a climber, collect all of your gear before climbing down. Same goes for climbing up. Climbing 30' up a tree then discovering you forgot to hook bow to rope. Even funnier still is when you lower your bow,climb down the tree,pack all your gear back in you r pack. Now it is dark you put on pack grab your bow. 5 steps later "someone " yanks your bow right out of your hand. Dam rope.
HAHA, yeah..... :-D
 

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killer midget said:
[quote="*ncountry*":emgczw4s]After a hunt in a tree-stand, especially a climber, collect all of your gear before climbing down. Same goes for climbing up. Climbing 30' up a tree then discovering you forgot to hook bow to rope. Even funnier still is when you lower your bow,climb down the tree,pack all your gear back in you r pack. Now it is dark you put on pack grab your bow. 5 steps later "someone " yanks your bow right out of your hand. Dam rope.
HAHA, yeah..... :-D[/quote:emgczw4s]

been there...lol
 

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some great tips!
 
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